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The Nose Knows

Posted in Essential oils and Health by drdave on September 11, 2009
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The Nasal Apparatus

Rhinologists (nose specialists) list about 30 distinct vital functions of the nose, including

  1. moisturizing and warming incoming air streams
  2. filtering dust
  3. modulating air flow
  4. registering smells

It takes about 150 percent more effort to breathe through the nose than through the mouth, so obviously Mother Nature had a specific purpose in mind when designing this apparatus, otherwise she would not permit such an extravagant expenditure of energy.

There are three big bulges inside the nose, convoluted like sea-shells, which stir and baffle incoming airstreams so that they become ‘turbulent’ and cover a much greater interior surface area. Called ‘turbinates’, these bulges also impart warmth and moisture to incoming air so that it does not shock the sensitive lungs with cold or dryness. That is the reason why people from cold northern and dry desert climates have long prominent noses with narrow nostrils: the cold and/or dry air from their environments enters the nose more slowly and must travel a greater distance over the warm, moist turbinates prior to entering the lungs. By contrast, natives of hot, humid climates tend to have short, flat noses with wide nostrils, because the air they breathe is already warm and moist. In cold and or dry climates, adepts should always exhale through the nose in order to replenish the heat and moisture borrowed from the turbinates during inhalation with heat and moisture from the lungs. In hot, humid climates, mouth exhalation is not only permissible, but sometimes preferable, as a method to expel excess heat from the body.

The entire nasal cavity is lined with mucus membranes which trap dust, debris and microbes and eliminate them through the nose along with stale air, or down the throat into the stomach with mucus. When the nose is healthy, this mucus coating is constantly moving and is replenished regularly by fine hairs called ‘cilia’, which sweep dirty mucus down the throat for digesting and elimination in the stomach. When the mucus coating gets too dry, the characteristic ‘crust’ of a clogged nose develops, making it impossible for the cilia to sweep mucus away. This condition results in accumulation of toxic debris in the nasal passages, which in turn renders the respiratory system vulnerable to colds and influenza. When the mucus is too fluid, ‘post nasal drip’ is the result.

The capacity of nasal membranes to absorb chee and resist infection is determined by the quality and quantity of nasal mucus which is largely dependent of diet and excretion.

An unbalanced diet full of mucus forming foods such as starch, sugar and pasteurized dairy products causes the nasal mucus to become thick and heavy. When excretory functions are blocked by constipation, shallow breathing, water retention, antiperspirants, and so forth, mucus must take up the extra burden by excreting toxins that are normally handled elsewhere, resulting in the cathartic discharge of tainted mucus characteristic of head colds, coughs and bronchitis.

Here’s another interesting nasal fact: the nose is the only organ in the entire body other than the sexual organs and breasts that contains erectile tissue.

All physicians are familiar with the phenomenon known as ‘Honeymoon Nose’, in which the excessive stimulation of sexual organs experienced by newlyweds causes a sympathetic swelling of the erectile tissue in the nasal passages.

It is erectile tissue that automatically alternates air flow between right and left nostrils by alternately shutting off one side. This natural phenomenon has only recently become known to Western physicians, who call it ‘infradian rhythm’, but Taoist have been aware of it for millennia.

The alternate blocking of one nostril occurs naturally about every two hours throughout the day, and it is intimately linked to the mechanisms of right-brain/left-brain functions. When air flows in through the right nostril, the body is geared for action. When air flows in through the left side, the body is prepared for physically passive mental functions. In Taoist parlance, the left nostril is identified with Yin, the right with Yang, and each is associated with a major energy channel that runs down the side of the spine. If both nostrils are not clear and properly functioning, breathing becomes unbalanced, assimilation of chee is impaired, and the equilibrium of Yin and Yang energies throughout our bodies is upset.

It is important to be aware of this natural switch-over between left and right nostril because sometimes one side gets stuck, in which case you must take measures to re-open it and re-balance your breathing.

If air flow is permitted to continue exclusively on one side for six or seven hours due to blockage or inflammation of the other nostril, disease of some sort usually sets in, and depression and lethargy are a certainty.

The simplest way to open a blocked nostril is to lie down on the side that is clear and breathe deeply through the nose. This tends to open up the clogged upper passage and close off the one below. Alternative nostril breathing is another good way to clear obstructed nostrils and balance breathing between left and right sides, and so is the ‘Bellows’ breath. You may also use acupressure to clear the nostril by applying deep thumb pressure to the feng-chir (‘Wind Pond’) points on the back of the head. These points are located where the base of the skull and the cervical vertebrae meet. Stretch the neck, find the points with your thumbs, then press deeply and rub hard four or five times. Release and repeat several times.

Credits – HPS-Online


The Nasal apparatus


Rhinologists (nose specialists) list about 30 distinct vital functions of the nose, including

  • moisturizing and warming incoming air streams
  • filtering dust
  • modulating air flow
  • registering smells

It takes about 150 percent more effort to breathe through the nose than through the mouth, so obviously Mother Nature had a specific purpose in mind when designing this apparatus, otherwise she would not permit such an extravagant expenditure of energy.

There are three big bulges inside the nose, convoluted like sea-shells, which stir and baffle incoming airstreams so that they become ‘turbulent’ and cover a much greater interior surface area. Called ‘turbinates’, these bulges also impart warmth and moisture to incoming air so that it does not shock the sensitive lungs with cold or dryness. That is the reason why people from cold northern and dry desert climates have long prominent noses with narrow nostrils: the cold and/or dry air from their environments enters the nose more slowly and must travel a greater distance over the warm, moist turbinates prior to entering the lungs. By contrast, natives of hot, humid climates tend to have short, flat noses with wide nostrils, because the air they breathe is already warm and moist. In cold and or dry climates, adepts should always exhale through the nose in order to replenish the heat and moisture borrowed from the turbinates during inhalation with heat and moisture from the lungs. In hot, humid climates, mouth exhalation is not only permissible, but sometimes preferable, as a method to expel excess heat from the body.

The entire nasal cavity is lined with mucus membranes which trap dust, debris and microbes and eliminate them through the nose along with stale air, or down the throat into the stomach with mucus. When the nose is healthy, this mucus coating is constantly moving and is replenished regularly by fine hairs called ‘cilia’, which sweep dirty mucus down the throat for digesting and elimination in the stomach. When the mucus coating gets too dry, the characteristic ‘crust’ of a clogged nose develops, making it impossible for the cilia to sweep mucus away. This condition results in accumulation of toxic debris in the nasal passages, which in turn renders the respiratory system vulnerable to colds and influenza. When the mucus is too fluid, ‘post nasal drip’ is the result.

The capacity of nasal membranes to absorb chee and resist infection is determined by the quality and quantity of nasal mucus which is largely dependent of diet and excretion.

An unbalanced diet full of mucus forming foods such as starch, sugar and pasteurized dairy products causes the nasal mucus to become thick and heavy. When excretory functions are blocked by constipation, shallow breathing, water retention, antiperspirants, and so forth, mucus must take up the extra burden by excreting toxins that are normally handled elsewhere, resulting in the cathartic discharge of tainted mucus characteristic of head colds, coughs and bronchitis.

Here’s another interesting nasal fact: the nose is the only organ in the entire body other than the sexual organs and breasts that contains erectile tissue. All physicians are familiar with the phenomenon known as ‘Honeymoon Nose’, in which the excessive stimulation of sexual organs experienced by newlyweds causes a sympathetic swelling of the erectile tissue in the nasal passages.

It is erectile tissue that automatically alternates air flow between right and left nostrils by alternately shutting off one side. This natural phenomenon has only recently become known to Western physicians, who call it ‘infradian rhythm’, but Taoist have been aware of it for millennia.

The alternate blocking of one nostril occurs naturally about every two hours throughout the day, and it is intimately linked to the mechanisms of right-brain/left-brain functions. When air flows in through the right nostril, the body is geared for action. When air flows in through the left side, the body is prepared for physically passive mental functions. In Taoist parlance, the left nostril is identified with Yin, the right with Yang, and each is associated with a major energy channel that runs down the side of the spine. If both nostrils are not clear and properly functioning, breathing becomes unbalanced, assimilation of chee is impaired, and the equilibrium of Yin and Yang energies throughout our bodies is upset.

It is important to be aware of this natural switch-over between left and right nostril because sometimes one side gets stuck, in which case you must take measures to re-open it and re-balance your breathing.

If air flow is permitted to continue exclusively on one side for six or seven hours due to blockage or inflammation of the other nostril, disease of some sort usually sets in, and depression and lethargy are a certainty.

The simplest way to open a blocked nostril is to lie down on the side that is clear and breathe deeply through the nose. This tends to open up the clogged upper passage and close off the one below. Alternative nostril breathing is another good way to clear obstructed nostrils and balance breathing between left and right sides, and so is the ‘Bellows’ breath. You may also use acupressure to clear the nostril by applying deep thumb pressure to the feng-chir (‘Wind Pond’) points on the back of the head. These points are located where the base of the skull and the cervical vertebrae meet. Stretch the neck, find the points with your thumbs, then press deeply and rub hard four or five times. Release and repeat several times.

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